Visual Arts

Visual Arts

"What do you think an artist is? He’s a political being, constantly alive to heartrending, fiery, or happy events, to which he responds in every way. No, painting is not done to decorate apartments. It is an instrument of war, for attack and defense against the enemy."

Pablo Picasso

Self portrait, 1630
Thursday, 26 September 2019 18:35

The revolutionary painting of Rembrandt van Rijn

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Jenny Farrell marks the 350th anniversary of the death of Rembrandt van Rijn with a discussion of some of his dynamic, democratic and deeply humane paintings Rembrandt’s Times In the 13th and 14th centuries, the Flemish cloth trade had developed into the strongest competitor of Florentine cloth makers and traders,…
The revolutionary realism of 'Peasant Bruegel'
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Saturday, 31 August 2019 13:14

The revolutionary realism of 'Peasant Bruegel'

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Jenny Farrell discusses the life and work of 'Peasant Bruegel', unearthing the radically subversive protests and criticisms of political domination which are expressed so beautifully in his paintings The greatest of the 16th century Dutch realists is without doubt Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Born around 1525, Bruegel died 450 years…
'I am a human and I will be seen': the anti-imperialist power of the photographic image
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Friday, 12 July 2019 13:04

'I am a human and I will be seen': the anti-imperialist power of the photographic image

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Kate Potts introduces an extract from Decolonising the Camera: Photography in Racial Time, the new book from Autograph ABP director Mark Sealy, published by Lawrence and Wishart This book trains Sealy’s sharp critical eye on the racial politics at work within photography. In the context of heated discussions around race…
A History of the Many, not the Few
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Tuesday, 09 July 2019 18:16

A History of the Many, not the Few

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Michal Boncza reviews The Many Not the Few, by Sean Michael Wilson and Robert Brown AT THE launch of this timely graphic “history of Britain shaped by the people” in the parliamentary annexe Portcullis House, Jeremy Corbyn made the point — and he should know— that change has never originated…
Absurd colours for absurd people: an exhibition ridiculing the right wing, by Heidrun Thate
Wednesday, 12 June 2019 19:19

Absurd colours for absurd people: an exhibition ridiculing the right wing, by Heidrun Thate

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Bianca Idelson reviews an exhibition by Heidrun Thate at the Sacripante Gallery, in Rome. Heidrun Thate, born in Germany but living in France for more than twenty years, paints Hitler's figure - with constancy, refinement, and even obstinacy - in the colours of a deliberately exaggerated range of the most…
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